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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 60 to 69 of about 89
good for the environment were now being planted from fence row to fence row. so by 1999 the price of corn was 50% above 1996 levels. i'm sorry, 50% below 1996 levels, and soy was down 41%. and farmers were in really major economic distress. is so there was all sorts of pressure on congress to do something. food industry lobbying meant that the policymakers didn't go back and address these problems by reinstating some supply management provisions. instead, congress used taxpayer money to keep farmers afloat so they wouldn't be putting pressure if rural areas on -- in rural areas on their members of congress. so these emergency payments were instituted in 1998. the payments were made permanent in the 2002 farm bill, and that that's how the subsidy system was born. so who are the main beneficiaries of this kind of subsidy system? it's really the food and the meat industry and the grain traders who are the winners. deregulation saves them money by allowing them to pay farmers less for their crops than it costs to produce those crops. so it's not the subsidies themselves that are actua
're in a recessionary environment and that we've actually cut a lot out of the spending. but my concern in all this, while $2.4 trillion is a lot of money to cut over ten years, i'm still concerned about the absolute amount of the debt outstanding which is $16.4 trillion because we've been getting a big break in recent years because the fed has kept interest rates so low. when those interest rates start ticking up, as they would when they end their quaun at this taf easing program and as they would if we don't get the debt ceiling raised, then that cost of interest expense is going to go through the roof. we could be spending as much as $500 billion a year on interest expense alone and that is not a good thing. >> all right. nbc's luke russert and bill cohen -- william cohen, sorry. thank you so much for joining me. >>> next, we'll go to the bous for all of the last-minute detai details. for you... ♪white house for all of the last-minute details. inging the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! >>> this
a family in the safe and healthy environment. they face threats that once did not exist and we at the capitol have better make sure we are helping them. not hurting them in their efforts. [applause] together we make great strides in the last four years to improve arizona's competitive position. we face the hardest of times but sustain and strengthen state government through the downturn. per capita, arizona has the second number of state employees of all states. [applause] reformed our personnel system they will have a -- motivated by performance and accountable. [applause] we have passed meaningful reform to pass our education system and expand school choice. we limited regulation and enacted the a largest and most tax cut in the state history. unlike our friends in washington, d.c. [applause] and we even accomplished something novel and rare in politics. we kept our word. in 2010, we asked the people to increase their own taxes and promised them it would be temporary. that promise will be kept when proposition 100 sales taxes inpyres in may -- expires in may. [applause] not l
something very different. the individual if you would have taught that in a classroom environment adjust a discussion on -- [inaudible] that's very important dynamic there. >> game changer, shell gas, more regulation, barrier, culture. i want to talk about the here mowns. [laughter] mcken city is about the cutting age looking at not only global manufacturing trends but trends you're describing advanced industry. and innovation. how do you see it? >> i think very much is said at the beginning of the context claus. there's a shift doing on. i think we should start by saying too many of us lump manufacturing in to one big category. i think there are at least five categories. i won't bore with them. i think the tip is the advanced manufacturing which is more using big data. it's advanced material. it's nano technology. it's the combination of many of the things the innovation capabilities that this country is good at the cross functional capability. as you said, it's -- it's roughly around 11 to 12% of gdp. it's extremely important fly wheel. it accounts, football we think, a third of the u.
deficits, and also to deal with our trade deficits, and create an environment where the businesses can grow in the united states. the most important thing is we come together with a comprehensive solution, not just working one piece or the other, but a comprehensive solution where we can start to grow the economy again for everybody. >> but the order in which we do things matters. first, raise the debt ceiling, allowing america to pay for its bills that it already racked up. then come up with a longer term plan that could put us back in fiscal good health. america's ability to meet its obligations should not be held hostage to an agreement on spending cuts. >>> retail sales went up by half a percentage in december. cars saw the biggest gain, jumping 1.8% at dealerships. other stores that see sales go up during the holiday season, like clothing and electronics, barely saw gains. while sales are expected to increase in 2013, it is slow going for now. for one thing, americans are getting a little less in their paycheck, now that the payroll tax holiday has ended. and a little less money means
are building on the money center banks. i actually feel the environment is still tough, maybe getting more friendlives can i ask you about the rally we've had generally? it's notable that goldman sachs has outperformed both the ac and citi with an 18% rise in the stock over the last month. today, of course, you downgraded goldman sachs in the light of that move. where are you on the sort of share price movement that is we might see in those three and oats moves forward? >> to see additional up side in a broker dealing, you have to see the economy get better. that could happen. i'm hoping it will happened. i'm just not sure if this is the time to put new money into goldman sachs, if we're sure not sure that will play its way out. it's just a matter of, how long does it take for the uncertainty to get out of the way, so companies can get back to making acquisitions. >> jeff, do people give you a hard time when you cut the ratings and yet boost the price targets? that gets made fun of a lot. >> yeah, we do get some for it. the price target increase, it's very form layically driven. what our p
, but making some judgments. you're going to have a consensus which is more typical of the urban environment. you're going to go into -- let's get back to laura. let's go back to bring the communities in and around or, colorado, what i think is an important conversation because i think you will find there is probably more consensus around the country for what we refer to as responsible common-sense gun legislation that complement's. we will also find in republican areas a lot of support for after-school programs. you will find a lot of that. so i think part of the way you get good at continuing that conversation, i would say that you dispel the cultural barriers. is very different to your reaction in montana. >> came to the staff to go fishing. as kid to my branch manager who is an avid outdoorsman and quite a political, owns a lot of guns but primarily traditional bow hunter. i said, rham emmanuel is coming. oh, my god. i've got to go hide my guns. and we left about this. they're going to love your guns. >> the secret service. >> the secret service came and they spend a lot of time. they ca
struck a down beat note warning that the global environment would remain challenging. let's take a look at shares. they are trading up nearly 4% in trade in london, up better than 7% in the last seven days. what's interesting, too, this is a company that last year just in talking about chinese sales saw shares get walked. >> after a really big run. there was a lot built into expectation owes that. >> this time, investors seemed happy about beating the last time. >> meantime, the 2% drop for same-store sales for h&m showed total sales up 8% last month, outperforming stims estimates. >>> coming up, we'll take a closer look at burberry with. >> inny carlisle, joining out at so is 10:45 a.m. central european time. set your alarm clock. >> something even more important is going on. for all of those who like a strong pint of bitter, the british beermaker has announced that it is reducing the alcohol content in its ale because of rising costs and lower demand. apparently watered down beer allows the parent company, heineken, to pay a lower rate of duty. so they're going to reduce the alcohol c
unemployment rate, none of which reflect a good economic environment. our goal is to have economic growth and create jobs. that's what we were elected to do. bill: we've seen in other states, florida for years, texas as well. what you would do is you would tax things that are currently not being taxed by the state, such as certain legal fees, accounting fees, spa services, and food. ultimately what would you get out of it? >> well, you have to look at some serious points. consumption-based sales and use tax very broad based on both goods and service efs is s is a very good economic driver as compared to the negative effect of income taxes which is a detriment to economic growth and jobs. what we believe is to expand the sales tax basin to goods and services, that is something that would absolutely create business activity, and therefore income and gdp growth and with that we were going to get rid of completely the negative taxes, which would be income taxes, both personal and corporate, and what that does is it will create jobs. bill: okay, now we -- i know you believe it's got a pretty g
in this interest rate environment has been a boom in the past couple of years. those are going to expire at some point. with interest rates where they are, it's difficult for the banks on margin. there's no question the banking system is much stronger, earning better and is has much higher capital and liquidity than it's had probably forever almost. >> you know, well, that's quite a statement because there's a lot of people who would still say banks shouldn't necessarily be turning around and handing capital back to shareholderses. would you agree that given the improvements we've made, it's time for them to be allowed to go forward? >> i think that the banks have accumulated so much capital and that they really don't have a good use for it in light of the lack of qualified loan demand. i'm not saying lack of loan demand because there's a lot of loan demand. but the credit standards are much higher and you don't have much to do with the capital. so you have to give it back if you don't need it. i'm talking about toous banks. it's not true around the world. the u.s. banks have very high capital r
Search Results 60 to 69 of about 89